Lung Genomics Research Consortium (LGRC)

At a Glance
  • Status: Active Consortium
  • Year Launched: 2009
  • Initiating Organization: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
  • Initiator Type: Government
  • Disease focus:
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Location: North America
LGRC

Abstract

The Lung Genomics Research Consortium (LGRC) is a group of top scientists from five U.S. institutions, whose mission is to transform the understanding of chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and interstitial lung disease (ILD) by using the advanced genomic technologies that have emerged from the Human Genome Project.

Mission

LGRC is applying new technologies in ways that inform understanding of these devastating lung diseases, with a focus on determining why certain people are more susceptible than others to illness and how to better treat those who are affected.

To help the research community answer these and other questions, LGRC is generating a rich resource of genetic and genomic data about lung disease; building a database to catalog the information; and sharing the database with the scientific community through an easy-to-use website.

LGRC is studying lung disease tissue samples obtained from the Lung Tissue Research Consortium (LTRC), another ongoing project funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). By combining the genomic data that it generates with existing clinical information obtained from the LTRC patient samples, LGRC will create an indispensable database to help all interested scientists better understand the causes of lung disease.

LGRC will share the lessons learned with other researchers and the public in an effort to accelerate scientific discoveries that can benefit patient care, such as developing ways to determine a person’s risk for a particular disease, diagnosing disease earlier, and creating treatments tailored to an individual’s unique genetic makeup.

Consortium History

Formed 
in 
2009, 
LGRC
 is 
a 
group 
of 
leading
 scientists from 
five 
prominent 
U.S.
 research 
institutions who
 are
 working 
together, and
 with 
outside 
research 
and 
technology
partners, to transform 
understanding 
of devastating 
chronic 
lung 
diseases, including
 COPD 
and 
interstitial 
lung
 disease
 ILD
 such 
as 
pulmonary 
fibrosis.

Financing

LGRC was established through an $11 million grant from NHLBI, which is funding the first two years of the project. This award is provided through funds appropriated for the National Institutes of Health Recovery Act as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)—the “stimulus bill” enacted by Congress in 2009. LGRC funds are used to hire and train new scientists in the growing field of genomic medicine, support existing research staff, and purchase the sophisticated equipment and supplies necessary to run the project — all of which are tangible outcomes that will benefit individuals and the nation for years to come.

Homepage

http://www.lung-genomics.org/lgrc

Points of Contact

askus@lung-genomics.org

Sponsors & Partners

Acsys Interactive

Agilent

Applied Biosystems

BioTeam

Boston University, Section for Computational Biomedicine and the Pulmonary Center

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

IDBS

Illumina

National Jewish Health, Center for Genes, Environment, and Health

Nimbelgen

Oracle

University of Colorado Denver, Genomics Core Facility

University of Pittsburgh, Dorothy P. and Richard P. Simmons Center for Interstitial Lung Disease

WaterGen


Last Updated: 04/22/2016

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